Thursday, August 25, 2016

Scientists may have discovered nature's fifth force — dark photons

Scientists may have discovered nature's fifth force

Posted May 26, 2016 19:45:28 Researchers in Hungary have discovered what they think may be the fifth force of nature, which could be a vital clue to understanding dark matter. There are currently four identified forces of nature: gravitational, electromagnetic, strong nuclear, and weak nuclear, but they do not interact with each other in ways that can be explained by the current mathematical model of the universe.

Scientists solve mystery of the Tully Monster

Scientists solve mystery of the Tully Monster

Posted March 17, 2016 09:27:42 For more than half a century, scientists have scratched their heads over the nature of an outlandishly bizarre creature dubbed the Tully Monster. But researchers today announced they had finally solved the mystery of the creature, which flourished about 307 million years ago in a coastal estuary in what is now north-eastern Illinois.

Friday, August 19, 2016

A Walk Through Water Before Reaching Land

African Lungfish Study Indicates That Walking Evolved in the Water

Roughly 400 million years ago, an ancient lobe-finned fish left its watery habitat to become the first four-limbed terrestrial creature. Its descendants - which are called tetrapods and include tree frogs, blue jays and human beings - typically get around by stepping, flying or jumping.

Fossil Called Missing Link From Sea to Land Animals

Fossil Called Missing Link From Sea to Land Animals

Scientists have discovered fossils of a 375-million-year-old fish, a large scaly creature not seen before, that they say is a long-sought missing link in the evolution of some fishes from water to a life walking on four limbs on land. In two reports today in the journal Nature, a team of scientists led by Neil H.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Behind Tomb Connected to Alexander the Great, Intrigue Worthy of "Game of Thrones"

Behind Tomb Connected to Alexander the Great, Intrigue Worthy of "Game of Thrones"

Suspense is rising as archaeologists sift for clues to the identity of the person buried with pomp and circumstance in the mysterious Amphipolis tomb in what is now northern Greece. The research team thinks the tomb was built for someone very close to Alexander the Great-his mother, Olympias; one of his wives, Roxane; one of his favorite generals; or possibly his childhood friend and lover, Hephaestion.

Rare Unlooted Grave of Wealthy Warrior Uncovered in Greece

Rare Unlooted Grave of Wealthy Warrior Uncovered in Greece

The text message from the trench supervisor to archaeologists Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker was succinct: "Better come. Hit bronze." The excavators exploring a small stone shaft on a rocky promontory in southern Greece had found an unusual tomb of an ancient warrior.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

More Humans and wild birds talk to each other to find honey in Mozambique

Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a female honeyguide bird.


Over thousands of years, honey hunters in northern Mozambique have forged a relationship with wild birds to find the location of bees' nests.

But not only do humans seek out the small birds known as honeyguides, the birds also actively seek out humans ensuring both species benefit, a new study shows.

Pioneering work by the Kenyan ecologist Hussein Isack in the 1980s confirmed honeyguides communicate reliable information to humans about the location of bees' nests, and this greatly increased honey-hunters' harvests, said the study's lead author Dr Claire Spottiswoode of the University of Cambridge in the UK and the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

In return, the greater honeyguide (Indicator indicator), which feeds from bees' nests, eating eggs, larvae and beeswax, relies on their human partner to crack open the hive.

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